Photo
tiffanybozic:

Ducks in a Row, 42” x 36”, acrylic on maple panel, 2014
In order top to bottom: Wood duck, Spectacled Eider, Mandarin duck, Buffle head, Mandarin again and finally a Harlequin duck. If you want to see more paintings like this visit www.tiffanybozic.com.
Thank you!

tiffanybozic:

Ducks in a Row, 42” x 36”, acrylic on maple panel, 2014

In order top to bottom: Wood duck, Spectacled Eider, Mandarin duck, Buffle head, Mandarin again and finally a Harlequin duck. If you want to see more paintings like this visit www.tiffanybozic.com.

Thank you!

Photo
ryanmcjunkin:

Birds were distracting today, can’t help it. East span of the Bay Bridge way back there. The old span is facing possible demolition delays with the nesting season of the double crested cormorant approaching. Doh! Red tail hawk eating a rat and northern mockingbird btw.

ryanmcjunkin:

Birds were distracting today, can’t help it. East span of the Bay Bridge way back there. The old span is facing possible demolition delays with the nesting season of the double crested cormorant approaching. Doh!
Red tail hawk eating a rat and northern mockingbird btw.

Photoset

rhamphotheca:

Fighting Weeds to Save Seabirds

Albatrosses are reclaiming nesting areas on Midway Atoll Refuge as a plant pest yields to assault by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

For the first time in years, choking mats of an invasive plant pest are receding from Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, opening critically needed nesting space for rare seabirds like the albatross. As cornstalk-high stands of Verbesina encelioides, or golden crownbeard, yield to an assault by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, hope for the birds is rising.

More seabirds nest and more chicks survive in Midway’s native grass than in non-native Verbesina, finds the Service, which is conducting the Verbesina eradication with a $1 million National Wildlife Refuge System grant and matching funds from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

Laysan and black-footed albatrosses nested at near-record levels in 2012-2013 at Midway Atoll in the Pacific, though biologists will need three or more years to know if the rise is due to Verbesina control. Another potentially promising sign: the January hatching of a short-tailed albatross chick, one of the world’s most endangered seabirds. The hatching was only the third in recorded history outside of three small islands near Japan; the earlier hatchings also occurred on Midway after plant control efforts began.

In addition to the three albatross species, the endangered Laysan duck and 18 other seabird species are expected to benefit from Verbesina’s removal…

(read more: USFWS - National Wildlife Refuge System)

Photos: Albatross in a verbesina-free area. (John Klavitter/USFWS). Next photos: Before and after.

Photo
California condor at Pinnacles National park. No, it’s not a vulture!

California condor at Pinnacles National park. No, it’s not a vulture!

Photo
libutron:

Impact - Osprey fishing | ©Miguel Lasa
Ospreys, Pandion haliaetus (Pandionidae), have vision that is well adapted to detecting underwater objects from the air. Prey is first sighted when the Osprey is 10–40 m (33–131 ft) above the water, after which the bird hovers momentarily then plunges feet first into the water [source].

libutron:

Impact - Osprey fishing | ©Miguel Lasa

Ospreys, Pandion haliaetus (Pandionidae), have vision that is well adapted to detecting underwater objects from the air. Prey is first sighted when the Osprey is 10–40 m (33–131 ft) above the water, after which the bird hovers momentarily then plunges feet first into the water [source].

(via blackyote)

Photo
libutron:

Masked trogon | ©George Scott
Trogon personatus (Trogoniformes - Trogonidae) in Manu National Park, Peru.
A widespread species of humid montane forests in South America.  Males are bronze to green on the head, chest, and upperparts, with red belly separated from the chest by a white band, black tail with broad white tips to the graduated rectrices, orange to red eye ring, and yellow bill; females are brownish above with a white eye ring.  
The species has an interesting highland distribution:  it is present along the Andes from Venezuela south to Bolivia, and also in the disjunct tepuis of Venezuela, Guyana, and northern Brazil. 
Here you can listen the calls from a female bird.
[Source]

libutron:

Masked trogon | ©George Scott

Trogon personatus (Trogoniformes - Trogonidae) in Manu National Park, Peru.

A widespread species of humid montane forests in South America.  Males are bronze to green on the head, chest, and upperparts, with red belly separated from the chest by a white band, black tail with broad white tips to the graduated rectrices, orange to red eye ring, and yellow bill; females are brownish above with a white eye ring.  

The species has an interesting highland distribution:  it is present along the Andes from Venezuela south to Bolivia, and also in the disjunct tepuis of Venezuela, Guyana, and northern Brazil. 

Here you can listen the calls from a female bird.

[Source]

(via rhamphotheca)

Photoset
Photo
peregrineinastoop:

Osprey by Philip Dunn
Photoset

astronomy-to-zoology:

Woolly-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus)

Also known as the Bishop Stork or White-necked Stork, the Woolly-necked Stork is a species of stork (Ciconiidae) that is widespread in Asia and Africa. Occurring from Guinea to Ethiopia and Zimbabwe in Africa, and from India to Indonesia in Asia. Like most storks C. episcopus typically inhabits wetland areas and feeds mainly on small vertebrates and large invertebrates.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Ciconiiformes-Ciconiidae-Ciconia-C. episcopus

Images: Kiranjotsingh and Kaippally

(via rhamphotheca)

Photoset

kestral/ Nimitz freeway